Swimming Strokes

Welcome to today’s class!!

We are thrilled to have you in our class!!

In today’s Physical Education Class class, we will be talking about Swimming Strokes

Swimming Strokes 

swimming strokes

The different types of swimming styles and strokes mainly include the freestyle stroke, backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly stroke, and sidestroke.

For competition, swimmers are allowed to compete in multiple events. For exercise, different muscles are used for different strokes, so learning all of the strokes provides a more comprehensive workout. For safety, different strokes can be used depending on the dangers of a particular situation.

  • Freestyle/Front Crawl

The front crawl is likely the first swimming stroke you think of when you picture swimming. It is commonly called the freestyle stroke as most swimmers choose to use this stroke in freestyle events as it is the fastest.

To execute the front crawl, you lie on your stomach with your body parallel to the water. Propel yourself forward with alternating arm movements in a sort of windmill motion that starts by pushing underwater and recovers above water. Your legs should propel you with a flutter kick, which is performed with pointed feet as your legs move up and down in alternation. Do not bend your legs at the knee.

  • Backstroke

The backstroke requires similar movements to the front crawl, but it is done, as the name suggests, on your back. Doctors often recommend this stroke to individuals with back problems as it provides a great back workout.

To perform the backstroke, while floating on your back, alternate your arms with a windmill-like motion to propel yourself backwards. Like the front crawl, your arms should start the circular motion by pushing underwater and recovering above water. Your legs should engage in a flutter kick. Your face should be above the surface as you look straight up.

Keep your body as straight as possible, with a slight decline in the lower body to keep your legs underwater. Don’t allow your hips to get too low or your body to bend too much or it will slow you down. Keep your legs close together and use the motion from your hips to get a more powerful kick.

  • Breaststroke

The breaststroke is the slowest competitive swimming stroke, and it is the most commonly learned stroke. It’s often taught to beginner swimmers because it does not require putting your head underwater. However, in competitive swimming, swimmers do submerge their head and breathe at designated points in the stroke.

This stroke is performed with your stomach facing down. Your arms move simultaneously beneath the surface of the water in a half circular movement in front of your body. Your legs perform the whip kick at the same time. The whip kick is executed by bringing your legs from straight behind you close to your body by bending both at your knees and at your hips. Your legs then move outward and off to the side before extending and coming back together. This swimming technique is often compared to a frog’s movement.

  • Butterfly

The butterfly is an advanced swimming stroke that provides an excellent workout. It can be more difficult and tiring to learn, but it is also a lot of fun. It is the second fastest competitive stroke.

To perform the butterfly stroke, start horizontal with your stomach facing the bottom of the pool. Bring your arms simultaneously over your head and push them into the water to propel you forward and bring them up out of the water again to repeat. As you move your arms into the water, you will push your head and shoulders above the surface of the water.

Your legs will perform a dolphin kick, which requires your legs to stay together and straight as you kick them similarly to how a dolphin’s lower body and tail moves. Move your body in a fluid wave-like motion.

  • Sidestroke

This is an older swimming style that is not typically used in swim competitions, but is still an important stroke to learn for safety reasons. It is most commonly used by lifeguards when they rescue someone, as this stroke most easily allows you to pull something along with you. It involves swimming on your side, as the name implies, propelling yourself forward with a scissor kick and alternating arm movements. It’s one of the easier strokes to learn, and can be a nice break from the more popular swim strokes if you’re looking to add more variety into your routine.

One way to remember the sidestroke is by comparing it to apple picking. Your first arm will stretch above your head and pick an apple, then your hands will meet in front of your chest. The first arm hands the apple to the second arm (the side of the body that is on top and partly out of the water). The second arm will reach out to toss the apple behind you as the first arm reaches above your head for another apple.

Evaluation

What is Swimming?

 

Reading Assignment

Identify any three swimming equipment.

 

Weekend Assignment

List any four Swimming Strokes.

 

We hope you enjoyed today’s class. In our next class, we will be writing a Midterm Test.

Let us know your thoughts and questions in the comment section, and we will attend to them as fast as we can.

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