Use of Comparative Forms of Adverbs in Sentences

 

Welcome to class! 

In today’s class, we will be talking about the use of comparative forms of adverbs in sentences. Enjoy the class!

Use of comparative forms of adverbs in sentences

Comparative Adverbs | classnotes.ng

  • How do we use comparative adverbs?

Now that you know how to make comparative adverbs, let’s see how to use them. Look at these examples. Notice that we may use more to suggest an increase in the action and less to suggest a decrease in the action. Notice also that the comparative adverb is often followed by than:

  1. Trains go fast but planes go faster.
  2. Planes go faster than trains.
  3. Trains don’t go faster than planes.
  4. Trains go more slowly than planes.
  5. Planes go less slowly than trains.
  6. I can’t hear you. Please speak louder/more loudly.

Although we use comparative adverbs when talking about two actions, in fact, one or both of the actions may be a group of actions.

  • The planet Mercury revolves around the sun faster than all the other planets.

Here, we are talking about eight planets, but we are still comparing one action (Mercury’s) to one other action (that of all the other planets).

Evaluation
  1. If you don’t study _______, you will fail your exam.
  • harder
  • hardly
  • more hard
  1. After the accident, he drives _______ now.
  • less carefully
  • more carefully
  • carefully than
  1. She speaks _______ before.
  • better
  • better than
  • more well than
  1. Mary can run _______ Jane.
  • faster
  • faster than
  • slower than

Guided informal letter: a letter to a friend on a chosen topic

  • Write a letter to your friend telling him/her about your school.

 

We hope you enjoyed the class.

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