Speech Pronunciation And Practice – Tongue Twister

Welcome to today’s class!!

We are excited to have you join our class!!

In today’s English class, we will be learning about Speech Pronunciation And Practice

In this Speech Work, we’ll be looking at tongue twisters in speech pronunciation and practice. 

Speech Pronunciation And Practice – Tongue Twister

 

tongue twister

 

Tongue twister is a phrase or sentence that is difficult to put together or articulate, often due to the presence of similar sounds. It’s typical to first encounter tongue twisters as a young student in school, where they are taught as a type of spoken word game.

The main challenge of a tongue twister is in saying it quickly and accurately without stumbling over the words and getting tongue-tied. 

Although some tongue twisters give rise to funny results when mispronounced, others take their amusement value from the confusion of the speaker.

Remember that an alliteration is simply the repetition of sounds. Words that begin with the same sound don’t have to be necessarily near to each other

alliteration

For instance, when alliteration is paired with rhyming words, it can result in a  tongue twister that sounds more like a joined singsong than anything understandable.

Let’s take this example below

Betty Botter bought a bit of butter. “But,” she said, “the butler’s bitter. If I put it in my batter, it will make my batter bitter. But, a bit of better butter will make my batter better.” So she bought a bit of butter better than her bitter butter.

Another type of tongue twister is one that employs and breaks apart compound words. Generally, these sentences will rely on one main compound word (like blueberry or toothbrush) and include variations of its idea in a form of wordplay.

Let’s take another example

How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

In summary, we can see from today’s class that although some tongue twisters give rise to funny results when mispronounced, others take their amusement value from the confusion of the speaker. Such as in the examples cited in the class. 

 

Evaluation

Explain the difference between a tongue twister and an alliteration

 

Reading Assignment

  • David Donald Doo dreamed of a dozen doughnuts and a duck-dog, too.”

Use your knowledge of this alliteration to form an example using the alphabet “D.”

 

Weekend Assignment

“Many mumbling mice are making midnight music in the moonlight,” 

Use your knowledge of this alliteration to form an example using the alphabet “M.”

 

We hope you enjoyed today’s class. In our next class, we will be learning about New Words And Their Meaning.

Let us know your thoughts and questions in the comment section, and we will attend to them as fast as we can.

 

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